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FABI, the Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute, at the University of Pretoria, is a post-graduate research institute that was established in 1997, based on a recognition that the future of forestry and agriculture in South Africa will strongly depend on the incorporation of new and emerging technologies into these industries. Major opportunities for these industries have emerged in recent times, from the applications of biotechnology and bioinformatics, amongst many others. FABI scientists undertake goal-directed research, in partnership with major players in the forestry and agricultural sectors in South Africa and in so doing, promote both human capital and industrial development in the country.

Being based at the University of Pretoria provides FABI with the capacity to build future human resources in biotechnology, that are crucial to the future of forestry and agriculture in South Africa. It also enables collaboration and linkage with the majority of statutory bodies undertaking research in the plant and animal sciences. Additional value comes from training grants, participation of students in research programmes, and an enormous human and technological resource associated with this University.

Staff at the University of Pretoria linked to FABI, have also had long-term associations with the fruit tree industry as well as with many other programmes linked to agricultural and forestry crops. Since its establishment, FABI has grown rapidly. FABI is made up of about 180 people including, more than 20 academic staff, 130+ postgraduate (Hons, MSc, PhD) students, postdoctoral fellows, research visitors, and a small core of technical and support staff. Approximately 30 languages are spoken by members of the FABI Team, illustrating a remarkably multinational and multicultural group.


New Publications

Machingambi NM, Roux J, Dreyer LL, Roets F. (2014) Bark and ambrosia beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae), their phoretic mites (Acari) and associated Geosmithia species (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) from Virgilia trees in South Africa. Fungal Biology 10.1016/j.funbio.2014.03.006
Haasbroek MP, Craven M, Barnes I, Crampton BG. (2014) Microsatellite and mating type primers for the maize and sorghum pathogen, Exserohilum turcicum. Australasian Plant Pathology 10.1007/s13313-014-0289-4
Mitchell RG, Wingfield MJ, Steenkamp ET, Roux J, Verryn S, Coutinho TA. (2014) Comparison of the tolerance of Pinus patula seedlings and established trees to infection by Fusarium circinatum. Southern Forests 10.2989/20702620.2014.899061
Wilken PM, Steenkamp ET, Wingfield MJ, De Beer ZW, Wingfield BD. (2014) DNA loss at the Ceratocystis fimbriata mating locus results in self-sterility. PLoS ONE 9(3):e92180. 10.1371/journal.pone.0092180 PDF

FABI Events

2014-04-24 08h30 Student Seminars FABI seminar room
Chairperson: David Read
Kirsti Snyders - Isolation of Citrus Tristeza Virus genotypes using single aphid transmissions and next-generation sequencing
Mashudu Nxumalo - The rhizobia associated with Lebeckia sensu lato
Alisa Postma - The genetics and molecular mechanisms of odour detection in insects
Vimbai Siziba - The development of microsatellite markers and genetic diversity of Dothistroma pini